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Mission Impossible

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Cast and crew of Four Days the film.
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Berlin, May Day 1990
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Poland, 1990
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Jennifer and Lena cue up the next song, 2002
The series, which was created and initially produced by Bruce Geller, follows the missions of the Impossible Missions Force (IMF), a team of secret agents employed by the United States government. The team is sent on covert missions to combat dictators, evil organizations, and (primarily in later episodes) crime lords. On occasion, the IMF is also shown conducting unsanctioned, private missions on behalf of its members.

The exact branch of the government overseeing the IMF is never identified, and in the 1980s revival it was suggested the IMF is an independent agency (as the FBI is legally bound to operate only within the U.S.A. and the CIA is likewise bound to only conduct its business outside the U.S.A.) until the first film which was made at the Langley, VA headquarters of the CIA. The IMF Director answered to "the Secretary," who the mission voice said "would disavow any knowledge of your actions" in the event "you or any of your IM Force" were to get "caught or killed," but exactly which secretary was never indicated.








Dick Cheney

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Cast and crew of Four Days the film.
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Berlin, May Day 1990
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Poland, 1990
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Jennifer and Lena cue up the next song, 2002
Cheney kept CIA program from Congress, source says WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The CIA withheld information about a secret counterterrorism program from Congress during the Bush administration on direct orders from then-Vice President Dick Cheney, current CIA director Leon Panetta told members of Congress, a knowledgeable source confirmed to CNN. Former Vice President Dick Cheney reportedly ordered the CIA to withhold information about counterterrorism.

Former Vice President Dick Cheney reportedly ordered the CIA to withhold information about counterterrorism.

The disclosure to the House and Senate intelligence committees about Cheney's involvement by Panetta was first reported in the New York Times. Efforts to contact Cheney for reaction were unsuccessful late Saturday.

The source who spoke to CNN did not want to be identified by name because the matter is classified, and CIA spokesman Paul Gimigliano declined comment on the report.

"It's not agency practice to discuss what may or may not have been said in a classified briefing," Gimigliano said. "When a CIA unit brought this matter to Director Panetta's attention, it was with the recommendation that it be shared with Congress. That was also his view, and he took swift, decisive action to put it into effect."

The fact that Panetta recently briefed lawmakers on an unspecified counterterrorism program was first revealed Wednesday, when a letter from seven House Democrats to Panetta was made public. The June 26 letter characterizes Panetta as testifying that the CIA "concealed significant actions from all members of Congress, and misled members for a number of years from 2001 to this week."

The letter contained no details about what information the CIA officials allegedly concealed or how they purportedly misled members of Congress.

A knowledgeable source familiar with the matter said the counterterrorism program in question was initiated shortly after the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington. Don't Miss

The program was on-again, off-again and was never fully operational, but was rather, a tool put on the shelf that could have been used, the source said. Panetta has put an end to the program, according to the source.

The disclosures follow a May spat between the spy agency and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who accused the CIA of misleading Congress during a secret 2002 briefing on harsh interrogation techniques being used on terrorism suspects. The CIA responded that Pelosi was told about the harsh techniques, including waterboarding, at the briefing.

However, the June 26 letter from the seven House Democrats noted that Panetta told CIA employees in a May 15 letter -- a response to the Pelosi allegation -- that it was not CIA policy to mislead Congress. The letter from the House Democrats asked Panetta to correct his May 15 statement "in light of your testimony."

Asked about the Democrats' letter, CIA spokesman George Little said Panetta "stands by his May 15 statement."

"This agency and this director believe it is vital to keep the Congress fully and currently informed. Director Panetta's actions back that up," Little said in a statement. "As the letter from these ... representatives notes, it was the CIA itself that took the initiative to notify the oversight committees."

The latest revelations come as lawmakers consider expanding the number of House and Senate members privy to the kind of secret briefing that Pelosi received.

The White House opposes a measure that would increase the number of briefing participants from the current eight to 40 members of Congress. A White House memo warned President Obama's senior advisers would recommend a veto of the bill if it contained the expanded briefing provision.

From Pam Benson CNN National Security Producer


Dick Cheney

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Cast and crew of Four Days the film.
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Berlin, May Day 1990
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Sandra Bullock, Good, 2007
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Dick Cheney, Evil, 2007
Cheney has been characterised as the most powerful and influential Vice President in history.[92][93] Both supporters and detractors of Cheney regard him as a shrewd and knowledgeable politician who knows the functions and intricacies of the federal government. A sign of Cheney's active policy-making role was then-House Speaker Dennis Hastert's provision of an office near the House floor for Cheney[94] in addition to his office in the West Wing,[95] his ceremonial office in the Old Executive Office Building,[96] and his Senate offices (one in the Dirksen Senate Office Building and another off the floor of the Senate).[94][97]

Cheney has actively promoted an expansion of the powers of the presidency, saying that the Bush administration’s challenges to the laws which Congress passed after Vietnam and Watergate to contain and oversee the executive branch — the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the Presidential Records Act, the Freedom of Information Act and the War Powers Resolution — are, in Cheney's words, “a restoration, if you will, of the power and authority of the president.”[98][99]

In June 2007, the Washington Post summarized Cheney’s vice presidency in a Pulitzer Prize-winning[100] four-part series, based in part on interviews with former administration officials. The articles characterized Cheney not as a “shadow” president, but as someone who usually has the last words of counsel to the president on policies, which in many cases would reshape the powers of the presidency. When former Vice President Dan Quayle suggested to Cheney that the office was largely ceremonial, Cheney reportedly replied, “I have a different understanding with the president.” The articles described Cheney as having a secretive approach to the tools of government, indicated by the use of his own security classification and three man-sized safes in his offices.[101]

The articles described Cheney’s influence on decisions pertaining to detention of suspected terrorists and the legal limits that apply to their questioning, especially what constitutes torture.[102] They characterized Cheney as having the strongest influence within the administration in shaping budget and tax policy in a manner that assures “conservative orthodoxy.”[103] They also highlighted Cheney’s behind-the-scenes influence on the administration’s environmental policy to ease pollution controls for power plants, facilitate the disposal of nuclear waste, open access to federal timber resources, and avoid federal constraints on greenhouse gas emissions, among other issues. The articles characterized his approach to policy formulation as favoring business over the environment.[104]

In June 2008, Cheney allegedly attempted to block efforts by Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to strike a controversial US compromise deal with North Korea over the communist state's nuclear program.[105]

In July 2008, a former Environmental Protection Agency official stated publicly that Cheney's office had pushed significantly for large-scale deletions from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report on the health effects of global warming "fearing the presentation by a leading health official might make it harder to avoid regulating greenhouse gases."[106] In October, when the report appeared with six pages cut from the testimony, The White House stated that the changes were made due to concerns regarding the accuracy of the science. However, according to the former senior adviser on climate change to Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Stephen Johnson, Cheney's office was directly responsible for nearly half of the original testimony being deleted.[106]

Cheney and former United States Attorney General Alberto Gonzales were indicted by a Texas grand jury for conflict of interest in his role as Vice President and "at least misdemeanor assaults" via his investments in private company that runs detention centers in Texas.[107] The grand jury indictment was related to Cheney's financial involvement with Vanguard Group, a company that contracts with the United States Government to operate Federal prisons and detention centers.[108] The charges specifically related to prisoner abuse in those centers.[109] The prosecutor, Juan Guerra, also brought indictments against several special prosecutors and judges that were involved in investigating his office for misconduct over the past several years. Guerra did not appear in court.[110][111] The indictments were dismissed by the judge as invalid on December 1, 2008.[112]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Cheney